The Fish
for 2 February 1998. Updated every WEEKDAY.
 
 
Suck Staff
 

Joey Anuff
Joey Anuff
Editor in Chief

 

Terry Colon
Terry Colon
Art Director

 

[the fixin' pixie... ]
Emily Hobson
Production Manager

 

Heather Havrilesky
Heather Havrilesky
Senior Editor

 

[Ian Connelly]
Ian Connelly
Marketing Manager

 

[Copy Edit]
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Suck Alumni
Suck Alumni Text
 

Carl Steadman
Carl Steadman
Co-Founder

 

Ana Marie Cox
Ana Marie Cox
Executive Editor

 

Sean (Duuuuude) Welch
Sean Welch
Suckgineer

 

Owen Thomas
Owen Thomas
Copy Editor

 


T. Jay Fowler

Production Manager

& Ass Kicker

 

[yes, it's a plunger. i'll l
eave the rest up to your imagination ... ]
Erin Coull
Production Manager

 

Matt Beer
Matt Beer
Development Manager

Vox Potuli

Nicely done. Can you please
tell the rest of America what
you said at Suck today?

Our country needs to start
using common sense about pot.
Your message was clear and
needs to be inhaled by the
mainstream.

I'm out.

cb

If I could tell my opinions
to the rest of America, do
you think I'd be writing for
Suck?

Actually, the country does
seem to be employing some
common sense on the issue.
The main obstacles now seem
to be the slow turning of the
wheels of government, the
essential timidity of elected
officials, and our sneaking
concern that if we legalized
pot our nation would soon
thereafter give up cancer
research, gene mapping, and
breakthroughs in
nanotechnology in favor of
languorous discussions about
the differences between Sarah
Gilbert, Sarah Jessica
Parker, Mary Louise Parker,
Mary Stuart Masterson, and
Melissa Sue Gilbert.

yr pal,
BarTel

 
Fish With Letter Icon
 

Excellent piece. Now, if only
we could get this "to legalize"
or "not to legalize" nonsense
done with. I need a store
dammit, so that I can get some
reefer that's weaker than the
current offerings. You know,
like Salsa. Mild, Strong,
Extra-Strong. All we get here
is Extra Strong and you know,
all I want is a light, fruity
little joint that will put a
slight glow on my jagged
little evenings. Nope, it's
can't-find-your-keys stuff or
nothing. And I can't weaken
it with tobacco 'cause that's
almost illegal. Even in
Quebec.

Donna

Alas, my 24-hour-a-day work
schedule leaves me little
opportunity to relax in a
fragrant fog of reefer. But
it's clear that today's
technology has far surpassed
the old are-you-high-yet weed
that made the scene in my
youth. What's amazing is that
anybody still makes a fuss
about having scored some
really killer weed. At this
point in our nation's
history, pot is like special
effects - we all know they
can do anything with the
stuff, so what's the big
whoop?

 
Fish With Letter Icon
 

What we need is a large
corporation to glamorize the
use of pot through media. It
worked for tobacco.

Great idea, Colonel! But I
thought the job of
glamorizing the pot lifestyle
was already being done by MST
3000.

yr pal,
BarTel

 
Fish With Letter Icon
 

Shameless Dread

I don't think Munch's
"nameless dread" suits our
age at all: After all, his
nightmares aren't ours. In
the same way that
Wordsworth's dread of urban
society is a precursor to our
own feelings, it doesn't
define what we now see. After
all, who can read
Wordsworth's poetry, barring
"The Preludes," and not
snigger?

The integration of Munch's
nightmare images into culture
follows that of many similar
nightmares, first as
terrifying stories, then
gradually morphing into
figures of fun. From the
nameless dread of giants to
"Jack and the Beanstalk."

Maybe we need something else,
something that actually
matches what we feel rather
than mis-appropriating the
totems of other ages.

Roger

Precisely my point, in a
roundabout way: That while
Munch's image of stark,
screaming angst resonates
with our millennial anxiety,
it's undercut by our
flattened affect and terminal
glibness. Munch's figure is at
once
the poster boy for
millennial dread and the butt
of camp humor. He stands at
the intersection of horror
and hilarity in the same way
that Quentin Tarantino's
Three Stooges allusions do in
Reservoir Dogs, or
Nicholson's "Honey, I'm home"
routine does in The Shining.
Which is why I quote Mike
Davis' pungent observation,
pace Walter Benjamin, that
what was once terrible seems
to have become fun. In other
words, we agree, in large
part.

Howard Beale

 
Fish With Letter Icon
 

Edvard Munch's The Scream is
gender-neutral? Au
contraire,
you state it
yourself when you described
the "hands clapped to his
head" and "tormented face of
one man's despair."

And don't give me that crap
about "man" being
gender-neutral. Armstrong
wasn't referring to women
when he said "One small step
for (a) man; a giant leap for
mankind"; otherwise NASA
wouldn't be sending John
Glenn's ancient lily-white
testosterone-filled butt into
space.

So give it up and get with
the PC program. "They" is the
proper pronoun, "human" at
least purports to include the
rest of us that are worth
more than a fractional value.

And yes, nit-picking is
hyphenated.

Georgia Mcnamara <Georgia.Mcnamara@iscorp.bellatlantic.COM>

They're filling John Glenn's
butt with testosterone? Is
that some new kind of
treatment for adjusting to
weightlessness?

 
Fish With Letter Icon
 

Oh, stop this The Scream
represents postmodern angst
hooey. The Scream is/was
little Eddie's version of an
orgasm. Just say it: ORGASM.
There. Feel better?

K. A. Eder <kathleen.a.eder@boeing.com>

Just because you work around
heavy equipment shaped like
gigantic phalluses all day
doesn't mean you have to read
sex into everything. Jeez.

 
Fish With Letter Icon
 

Although I have yet to decide
upon the stance of your
article, I will assume for
the benefit of this response,
that you take a negative
stance on the campy
resurgence of my favorite
painting, Munch's Scream.
After all this is a Suck
article. I've got the
inflatable toy, the tie, the
poster in my home office, all
given to me by my mother, a
painter. What is so wrong
about finding fun in our
shared despair? I could care
less about the coming
millennium and all relevant
anxieties. As long as my ATM
machine knows what the date
is, and I have something to
do the night before, what's
the big deal? We as a
civilization have a
responsibility to accept what
is bad and create the best
life we can. This has always
been the case, only now we
confront the human idea of
"self" with mass media. A
condition which McLuhan
promptly responded to by
releasing copies of his
manifesto with an intentional
misspelling. Truly the
question is: Message or
Massage?

In today's modern Scream we
find both. The deeper despair
that permeates us all, and
the willingness, no, the
instinct, to overcome. The
Scream
is a tool, an icon.
Double click its double
meaning and you comfortably
expose the truth about
yourself.

However, you bring a good
point to light. We as humans
rarely observe ourselves.
We'd rather go on living
without so much as a thought
of being a part of the whole.
Why do that when the package
sits on the shelf ready to
take home and inflate? Leave
the painting to the painters.
Me? I'm going to ask the
violin player out after the
end of the world concert,
have some postmodern coffee,
and share run-on sentences
about trendy angst.

Tristan Tomaselli <tristan@servtech.com>

If we're going to be bores,
it's good to know that at
least our angst is trendy. If
only we could fashion an
inflatable toy, a tie, and a
poster out of it; your mom
might buy those, too.

 
Fish With Letter Icon
 

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